Worm

Worm

, v. t. 1. To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; -- often followed by out.
[1913 Webster]

They find themselves wormed out of all power.
Swift.
[1913 Webster]

They . . . wormed things out of me that I had no desire to tell.
Dickens.
[1913 Webster]

2. To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm. See Worm, n. 5 (b).
[1913 Webster]

3. To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of, as a dog, for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw. The operation was formerly supposed to guard against canine madness.
[1913 Webster]

The men assisted the laird in his sporting parties, wormed his dogs, and cut the ears of his terrier puppies.
Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) To wind rope, yarn, or other material, spirally round, between the strands of, as a cable; to wind with spun yarn, as a small rope.
[1913 Webster]

Ropes . . . are generally wormed before they are served.
Totten.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

To worm one's self into, to enter into gradually by arts and insinuations; as, to worm one's self into favor.
[1913 Webster]

 

New - Add Dictionary Search to Your Site

You can add a free dictionary search box to your own web site by copying and pasting the following HTML into one of your web pages:

<form action="http://www.freedict.co.uk/search.php" method="post">
 <p style="text-align: center; font-family: sans-serif;">
  <a style="font-weight: bold;" href="http://www.freedict.co.uk/"
     title="FreeDict free online dictionary">FreeDict</a>
  <input type="text" name="word" size="20" value="" />
  <input type="submit" name="submit" value="Search Dictionary" />
 </p>
</form>

 

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Mon 10th December 2018