Stick

Stick

(?), v. i. 1. To adhere; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall.
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The green caterpillar breedeth in the inward parts of roses not blown, where the dew sticketh.
Bacon.
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2. To remain where placed; to be fixed; to hold fast to any position so as to be moved with difficulty; to cling; to abide; to cleave; to be united closely.
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A friend that sticketh closer than a brother.
Prov. xviii. 24.
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I am a kind of bur; I shall stick.
Shak.
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If on your fame our sex a bolt has thrown,
'T will ever stick through malice of your own.
Young.
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3. To be prevented from going farther; to stop by reason of some obstacle; to be stayed.
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I had most need of blessing, and "Amen"
Stuck in my throat.
Shak.
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The trembling weapon passed
Through nine bull hides, . . . and stuck within the last.
Dryden.
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4. To be embarrassed or puzzled; to hesitate; to be deterred, as by scruples; to scruple; -- often with at.
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They will stick long at part of a demonstration for want of perceiving the connection of two ideas.
Locke.
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Some stick not to say, that the parson and attorney forged a will.
Arbuthnot.
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5. To cause difficulties, scruples, or hesitation.
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This is the difficulty that sticks with the most reasonable.
Swift.
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To stick by. (a) To adhere closely to; to be firm in supporting. "We are your only friends; stick by us, and we will stick by you." Davenant. (b) To be troublesome by adhering. "I am satisfied to trifle away my time, rather than let it stick by me." Pope. -- To stick out. (a) To project; to be prominent. "His bones that were not seen stick out." Job xxxiii. 21. (b) To persevere in a purpose; to hold out; as, the garrison stuck out until relieved. [Colloq.] -- To stick to, to be persevering in holding to; as, to stick to a party or cause. "The advantage will be on our side if we stick to its essentials." Addison. -- To stick up, to stand erect; as, his hair sticks up. -- To stick up for, to assert and defend; as, to stick up for one's rights or for a friend. [Colloq.] -- To stick upon, to dwell upon; not to forsake. "If the matter be knotty, the mind must stop and buckle to it, and stick upon it with labor and thought." Locke.
[1913 Webster]

 

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Tue 11th December 2018