Place

Place

(?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Placed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Placing (?).] [Cf. F. placer. See Place, n.] 1. To assign a place to; to put in a particular spot or place, or in a certain relative position; to direct to a particular place; to fix; to settle; to locate; as, to place a book on a shelf; to place balls in tennis.
Syn. -- Put.
[1913 Webster]

Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown.
Shak.
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2. To put or set in a particular rank, office, or position; to surround with particular circumstances or relations in life; to appoint to certain station or condition of life; as, in whatever sphere one is placed.
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Place such over them to be rulers.
Ex. xviii. 21.
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3. To put out at interest; to invest; to loan; as, to place money in a bank.
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4. To set; to fix; to repose; as, to place confidence in a friend. "My resolution 's placed." Shak.
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5. To attribute; to ascribe; to set down.
[1913 Webster]

Place it for her chief virtue.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Racing) To determine or announce the place of at the finish. Usually, in horse racing only the first three horses are placed officially.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

7. (Rugby Football) To place-kick ( a goal).
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

8. to recognize or identify (a person). [Colloq. U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Pla*ce"bo

(?), n. [L., I shall please, fut. of placere to please.] 1. (R. C. Ch.) The first antiphon of the vespers for the dead.
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2. (Med.) A prescription with no pharmacological activity given to a patient to humor or satisfy the desire for medical treatment.
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3. (Med.) a dose of a compound having no pharmacological activity given to a subject in a medical experiment as part of a control experiment in a test of the effectiveness of another, active pharmacological agent.
[PJC]

To sing placebo, to agree with one in his opinion; to be complaisant to. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Pla*ce"bo ef*fect`

(?), n. (Med.) a reaction by a patient who receives a placebo{2}, in which the symptoms of illness are lessened or an anticipated effect is experienced. Because the placebo{2} itself has no pharmacological activity, this reaction is mediated by the expectations of the patient receiving the placebo{2}; the reaction is considered as an example of the power of suggestion. Dramatic subjective effects such as relief of discomfort or pain are sometimes observed due to administration of a placebo, but in some cases measurable physiological effects may also be observed.
[PJC]

 

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Fri 14th December 2018