Magnet

Mag"net

(mg"nt), n. [OE. magnete, OF. magnete, L. magnes, -etis, Gr. Magnh^tis li`qos a magnet, metal that looked like silver, prop., Magnesian stone, fr. Gr. Magnhsi`a, a country in Thessaly. Cf. Magnesia, Manganese.] 1. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; -- called also natural magnet.
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Dinocrates began to make the arched roof of the temple of Arsino all of magnet, or this loadstone.
Holland.
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Two magnets, heaven and earth, allure to bliss,
The larger loadstone that, the nearer this.
Dryden.
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2. (Physics) A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; -- called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet.
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An artificial magnet, produced by the action of an electrical current, is called an electro-magnet.
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Field magnet (Physics & Elec.), a magnet used for producing and maintaining a magnetic field; -- used especially of the stationary or exciting magnet of a dynamo or electromotor in distinction from that of the moving portion or armature.
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{

Mag*net"ic

(?),

Mag*net"ic*al

(?), } a. [L. magneticus: cf. F. magntique.] 1. Pertaining to the magnet; possessing the properties of the magnet, or corresponding properties; as, a magnetic bar of iron; a magnetic needle.
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2. Of or pertaining to, or characterized by, the earth's magnetism; as, the magnetic north; the magnetic meridian.
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3. Capable of becoming a magnet; susceptible to magnetism; as, the magnetic metals.
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4. Endowed with extraordinary personal power to excite the feelings and to win the affections; attractive; inducing attachment.
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She that had all magnetic force alone.
Donne.
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5. Having, susceptible to, or induced by, animal magnetism, so called; hypnotic; as, a magnetic sleep. See Magnetism. [Archaic]
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Magnetic amplitude, attraction, dip, induction, etc. See under Amplitude, Attraction, etc. -- Magnetic battery, a combination of bar or horseshoe magnets with the like poles adjacent, so as to act together with great power. -- Magnetic compensator, a contrivance connected with a ship's compass for compensating or neutralizing the effect of the iron of the ship upon the needle. -- Magnetic curves, curves indicating lines of magnetic force, as in the arrangement of iron filings between the poles of a powerful magnet. -- Magnetic elements. (a) (Chem. Physics) Those elements, as iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, etc., which are capable or becoming magnetic. (b) (Physics) In respect to terrestrial magnetism, the declination, inclination, and intensity. (c) See under Element. -- Magnetic fluid, the hypothetical fluid whose existence was formerly assumed in the explanations of the phenomena of magnetism; -- no longer considered a meaningful concept. -- Magnetic iron, or Magnetic iron ore. (Min.) Same as Magnetite. -- Magnetic needle, a slender bar of steel, magnetized and suspended at its center on a sharp-pointed pivot, or by a delicate fiber, so that it may take freely the direction of the magnetic meridian. It constitutes the essential part of a compass, such as the mariner's and the surveyor's. -- Magnetic poles, the two points in the opposite polar regions of the earth at which the direction of the dipping needle is vertical. -- Magnetic pyrites. See Pyrrhotite. -- Magnetic storm (Terrestrial Physics), a disturbance of the earth's magnetic force characterized by great and sudden changes. -- magnetic tape (Electronics), a ribbon of plastic material to which is affixed a thin layer of powder of a material which can be magnetized, such as ferrite. Such tapes are used in various electronic devices to record fluctuating voltages, which can be used to represent sounds, images, or binary data. Devices such as audio casette recorders, videocasette recorders, and computer data storage devices use magnetic tape as an inexpensive medium to store data. Different magnetically susceptible materials are used in such tapes. -- Magnetic telegraph, a telegraph acting by means of a magnet. See Telegraph.
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Wed 19th December 2018