Horizon

Ho*ri"zon

(?), n. [F., fr. L. horizon, fr. Gr. (sc. ) the bounding line, horizon, fr. to bound, fr. boundary, limit.] 1. The line which bounds that part of the earth's surface visible to a spectator from a given point; the apparent junction of the earth and sky.
[1913 Webster]

And when the morning sun shall raise his car
Above the border of this horizon.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

All the horizon round
Invested with bright rays.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Astron.) (a) A plane passing through the eye of the spectator and at right angles to the vertical at a given place; a plane tangent to the earth's surface at that place; called distinctively the sensible horizon. (b) A plane parallel to the sensible horizon of a place, and passing through the earth's center; -- called also rational horizon or celestial horizon. (c) (Naut.) The unbroken line separating sky and water, as seen by an eye at a given elevation, no land being visible.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Geol.) The epoch or time during which a deposit was made.
[1913 Webster]

The strata all over the earth, which were formed at the same time, are said to belong to the same geological horizon.
Le Conte.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Painting) The chief horizontal line in a picture of any sort, which determines in the picture the height of the eye of the spectator; in an extended landscape, the representation of the natural horizon corresponds with this line.
[1913 Webster]

5. The limit of a person's range of perception, capabilities, or experience; as, children raised in the inner city have limited horizons.
[PJC]

6. [fig.] A boundary point or line, or a time point, beyond which new knowledge or experiences may be found; as, more powerful computers are just over the horizon.
[PJC]

Apparent horizon. See under Apparent. -- Artificial horizon, a level mirror, as the surface of mercury in a shallow vessel, or a plane reflector adjusted to the true level artificially; -- used chiefly with the sextant for observing the double altitude of a celestial body. -- Celestial horizon. (Astron.) See def. 2, above. -- Dip of the horizon (Astron.), the vertical angle between the sensible horizon and a line to the visible horizon, the latter always being below the former. -- Rational horizon, and Sensible horizon. (Astron.) See def. 2, above. -- Visible horizon. See definitions 1 and 2, above.
[1913 Webster]

 

New - Add Dictionary Search to Your Site

You can add a free dictionary search box to your own web site by copying and pasting the following HTML into one of your web pages:

<form action="http://www.freedict.co.uk/search.php" method="post">
 <p style="text-align: center; font-family: sans-serif;">
  <a style="font-weight: bold;" href="http://www.freedict.co.uk/"
     title="FreeDict free online dictionary">FreeDict</a>
  <input type="text" name="word" size="20" value="" />
  <input type="submit" name="submit" value="Search Dictionary" />
 </p>
</form>

 

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Sun 09th December 2018