Expediate

Ex*pe"di*ate

(?), v. t. [Cf. F. expdier. See Expedite.] To hasten; to expedite. [Obs.] "To expediate their business." Sir E. Sandys.

{

Ex*pe"di*ence

(?),

Ex*pe"di*en*cy

(?), }, n. 1. The quality of being expedient or advantageous; fitness or suitableness to effect a purpose intended; adaptedness to self-interest; desirableness; advantage; advisability; -- sometimes contradistinguished from moral rectitude or principle.
[1913 Webster]

Divine wisdom discovers no expediency in vice.
Cogan.
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To determine concerning the expedience of action.
Sharp.
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Much declamation may be heard in the present day against expediency, as if it were not the proper object of a deliberative assembly, and as if it were only pursued by the unprincipled.
Whately.
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2. Expedition; haste; dispatch. [Obs.]
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Making hither with all due expedience.
Shak.
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3. An expedition; enterprise; adventure. [Obs.]
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Forwarding this dear expedience.
Shak.
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Fri 14th December 2018