Diapason

Di`a*pa"son

(?), n. [L., fr. Gr. diapasw^n (i. e., "h dia` pasw^n chordw^n symfoni`a the concord of the first and last notes, the octave); dia` through + pasw^n, gen. pl. of pa^s all: cf. F. diapason. Cf. Panacea.] 1. (Gr. Mus.) The octave, or interval which includes all the tones of the diatonic scale. Compare disdiapason.
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2. Concord, as of notes an octave apart; harmony.
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The fair music that all creatures made . . .
In perfect diapason.
Milton.
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3. The entire compass of tones; the entire compass of tones of a voice or an instrument.
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Through all the compass of the notes it ran,
The diapason closing full in man.
Dryden.
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4. A standard of pitch; a tuning fork; as, the French normal diapason.
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5. One of certain stops in the organ, so called because they extend through the scale of the instrument. They are of several kinds, as open diapason, stopped diapason, double diapason, and the like.
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Di`a*pe*de"sis

(?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a leaping or oozing through, fr. to leap through; dia` through + to leap.] (Med.) The passage of the corpuscular elements of the blood from the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues, without rupture of the walls of the blood vessels.
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Sat 15th December 2018